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Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi

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THE SELF IS ONLY AWARE, NOT EXPERIENCING AS SUCH

D.: Why should not the Self be both witness and experiencer of the three states?

M.: Just as the witness watching two men fighting with each other does not fight himself, so also the witness cannot be the experiencer. Again as the fighter does not simply watch the fight but himself fights, so also the experiencer cannot be the witness. Therefore the same Self cannot be both the experiencer and the witness.


D.: Now what is the conclusion?

M.: The ‘false-I’ is the experiencer and the other one who is unconcernedly watching the states and their experiencer is the witness.


D.: In that case, for the three states are there three different witnesses or is there only one?

M.: The witness is only one whereas the states alternate one with another; the witness does not change. The same continuous awareness runs through the appearance, staying and disappearance of the three states. Thus the witness of the three states is the Self.

-Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi

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Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi

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ONE STATE FOR THE REALIZED JNANI THROUGHOUT 24 HOURS

Dream and sleep are for the same person as waking. You are the witness of both – they pas before you. Because you are out of meditation now, such questions arise.

What happens to the consciousness of a Realized one in sleep? Such a question arises only in the minds of unrealized beholders. He has but ONE state, which is unbroken throughout 24 hours, whether in what you call sleeping or waking. As a matter of fact the majority of people are all asleep, because they are not awake to the Self.

In the deep sleep state we lay down our ego (ahankara), our thoughts and desires. If we could only do all this while we are conscious, we would realize the Self.

The best form of dhyana or meditation is when it continues not merely in waking but extends to dream and deep sleep states. The meditation must be so intense as to not even give room for the consciousness of the idea ‘I am meditating’. As waking and dreaming are fully occupied by the dhyana of such a person, deep sleep may be considered to be part of the dhyana.

Conscious Immortality p 97

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Zen-Master Bassui Tokusho
(1327 – 1387)

In the year 1327, toward the close of the Kaniakura era - that strife torn, anxiety-ridden period of Japanese history which produced so many notable religious figures - the Rinzai Zen master Bassui Tokusho was born. Having had a vision that the child she was carrying would one day become a fiend who would slay both his parents, his mother abandoned him in a field at birth, where a family servant secretly rescued and reared him.
At seven Bassui's sensitive religious mind began to evince itself. At a memorial service for his late father he suddenly asked die officiating priest: "For whom are those offerings of rice and cakes and fruit?*' "For your father, of course," replied the priest, *'But Father has no shape or body now,1 so how can he eat them?" To this the priest answered; "Though he has no visible body, his soul will receive these offerings." "If there is such a thing as a soul," the child pressed on, "I must have one in my body. What is it like?"
To be sure, these are not unusual questions from a thoughtful, sensitive child of seven. For Bassui, however, they were only the beginning of an intense, unremitting self-inquiry which was to continue well into manhood - until, in fact, he had achieved full enlightenment. Even during his play with other children he was never free of these uncertainties as to the existence of a soul, His preoccupation with a soul naturally led him to think about hell. In an agony of fear he would exclaim; "How awful to be consumed by the flames of hell!" and tears would well up. When he was ten, he relates, he was often awakened by brilliant flashes of light which filled his room, followed by an all-enveloping darkness. Anxiously he sought for some explanation of these weird occurrences, but the replies that were forthcoming scarcely allayed his fears.
Again and again he questioned himself: "If after death the soul suffers the agonies of hell or enjoys the delights of paradise, what is the nature of this soul? But if there is no soul, what is it within me which thisvery moment is seeing and hearing?" His biographer1 relates that Bassui would often sit for hours" stewmg " over this question in a state of such utter sclf-forgetfulncss that he no longer knew he had a body or a mind. On one such occasion-at what age we are not told-Bassui suddenly directly realized that the substratum of all things is a viable Emptitieis, and that there is in essence tiothmg which cm be called a soul, a body, or a mind. This realization caused him to break into deep laughter, and he no longer felt himself oppressed by his body and mind.
In an effort to learn whether this constituted true satori, Bassui questioned a number of well-known monks, but none could give him a satisfying answer. "At any rate," he told himself, "T no longer have doubts about the truth of the Dharma*" But his basic perplexity as to the one who sees and hears had not been dispelled, and when he saw in a popular book one day "Mind is host and body guest." every one of his quiescent doubts was suddenly resurrected. "T have seen that the foundation of the universe is Voidness; still what is this something within me which can see and hear?" he desperately asked himself anew. In spite of every effort, he could not rid himself of this doubt.
Nominally Bassui was a samurai, having been bom into a samurai family. Whether he actually pursued the duties of a samurai his biographer does not reveal, but it seems safe to conclude that Bassui' s continuous search for Zen masters would have given him little opportunity, and presumably as little taste, for the life of a samurai. At all events, we do know that Bassui had his head shaved at twenty-nine, symbolizing his initiation into the Buddhist monkhood. For the ceremonial rites of a monk or priest, however, he had little use, believing a monk should live a simple life dedicated to attaining the highest truth so as to lead others to liberation, and not engage in ceremony and luxurious living, not to mention political intrigue, to which the priesthood of his day was only too prone.
On his numerous pilgrimages he stubbornly refused to remain even overnight in a temple, but insisted on staying in some isolated hut high up on a hill or mountain, where he would sit hour after hour doing zazen away from the distractions of the temple. To stay awake he would often climb a tree, perch among the branches, and deeply ponder his natural koan, "Who is the master?" far into the night, oblivious to wind and rain. In the morning, with virtually no sleep or food, he would go to the temple or monastery for an interview with the master. So strong was Bassui?s distaste for the ceremonialism of the temple that many years later, after he had become master of Kogaku-ji, he always insisted on calling it Kogaku-an instead, the suffix -an meaning "hermitage" as opposed to the more grandiose -ji meaning "temple" or "monastery.".
In the course of his spiritual journeys Bassui eventually met the Zen master through whom his Mind`s Eye was to be completely opened - Koho-zenji, a great roshi of his day. The lesser masters from whom Bassui had sought guidance had all sanctioned his enlightenment, but Koho, sensing Bassui`s keen, sensitive mind and the strength and purity of his yearning for truth, did not give him his stamp of approval but merely invited him to remain. On his part, Bassui recognized in Koho a great roshi but declined to stay in his temple, taking a solitary hut in the nearby hills and for the next month coming daily to see Koho.
One day Koho, sensing the ripeness of Bassui`s mind, asked him: "Tell me, what is Joshu`s Mu?" Bassui replied with a verse:

Mountains and rivers
Grass and trees
Equally manifest Mu.

Koho retorted: "Your reply has traces of self-consciousness!" All at once, his biographer relates, Bassui felt as though he had "lost his life root, like a barrel whose bottom had been smashed open." Sweat began to stream from every pore of his body, and when be left Koho's room he was in such a daze that he bumped his head several times along the walls trying to find the outer gate of the temple. Upon reaching his hut he wept for hours from his very depths. The tears overflowed, "pouring down his face like rain." In the intense combustion of this overwhelming experience Bassui's previously-held conceptions and beliefs, we are told, were utterly destroyed.
The following evening Bassui came to tell Koho what had happened. Hardly had he opened his mouth when Koho, who had despaired of ever finding a true successor among his monks, declared, as though addressing ail his followers; "My Dharma will not vanish, All may now be happy. My Dharma will not disappear." Koho formally conferred inka on his disciple and gave him the Zen name "Bassui" - "high above average." Bassui remained for two months near Koho, receiving his instructions and guidance, But Bassui, who had a strong and independent mind, wished to mature his profound experience through "Dharma combat" with accomplished masters so as to integrate his experience thoroughly into his conscious mind and into his every act, and to develop his capacity to teach others. So he left Koho and continued to live an isolated life in forests, hills, and mountains not far from the temples of famous masters. When not engaging them in "Dharma combat" he would carry on his zazen for hours at a time.
Wherever he stayed zealous aspirants quickly discovered his where-abouts and sought his guidance but feeling himself still deficient in the spiritual strength necessary to lead others to liberation, he resisted their efforts to make him their teacher. When their entreaties became importunate he would pick up his meager belongings and vanish in the night. Apart from the entreaties of would-be disciples, however, he deliberately curtailed his stay in any one place so as not to become attached to it. At length - now fifty - Bassui built himself a hut deep in a mountain near the town of Enzan in Yamanashi Prefecture. As had happened in the past, word spread through the nearby village of the presence in the mountain of a Bodhisattva, and seekers again began literally to beat a path to his hut. Now, his enlightenment having ripened and feeling himself capable of leading others to emancipation, he no longer turned away from these seekers but willingly accepted all who came. Soon they became a sizable flock, and when the governor of the province offered to donate land for a monastery and his followers offered to build it, Bassui agreed to become its roshi.
Although Bassui disliked the designation "temple" or "monastery," Kogaku-ji at its apogee, with more than a thousand monks and lay devotees, could hardly be described as a hermitage. Bassui was a rigid disciplinarian, and of the thirty-three rules which he promulgated for the behavior of his disciples, interestingly enough, the first prohibited the imbibing of alcohol in any form. Just before he passed away, at the age of sixty, Bassui sat up in the lotus posture and, to those gathered around him. said: ''Don't be misled! Look directly! What is this?" He repeated this loudly and then calmly died.
Taken from the book: "The three Pillars of Zen", by Roshi Philip Kapleau

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Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi

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Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev

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“We are all unique! Each one of us is different and it is so wonderful that we are different.

Andriy shared a Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev quote         SHARE URL

Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev

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don’t worry about your anger. At least in anger you’re becoming intense. It’s time to transform this intensity into higher levels of intensity where it’s very beautiful. At least somebody’s able to get angry, I’m happy. I can’t bear with the people who are eating eight meals a day and are just lethargic, and nothing happens within them; they don’t even get angry. If anger is happening at least some life is cooking within you; life is still kicking, you know?

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Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev

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Your body, your mind, your emotion, and your energies – these are the vehicles through which you are travelling through life. Without any understanding about it, without any control about it, without any subjective experience about it, you’re trying to live your life. But, it is an accidental existence

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Sutras

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When all thoughts, all words, and all deeds are given up unto the Lord, and the least forgetfulness of God makes one intensely miserable, then love has begun.

NARADA BHAKTI SUTRAS

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Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev

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When you act in unity with all life, you act without identity

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Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev

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Being joyful means you have absolutely no compulsions of your own anymore. Once you have no compulsions, being the way the situation demands is not a tall an effort for you, isn’t it?

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Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev

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Andriy shared a Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev quote         SHARE URL

Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev

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With proper practice of yoga , you create the right kind of chemistry where you are naturally peaceful, naturally joyous,naturally loving within you

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Ribhu Gita

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Apart from the all-pervasive, perfectly full Self,
There is no world or individual (jiva) or such.
The world, the individual, and the Supreme
Are entirely of the nature of the Supreme Self,
Which is higher than the highest.
There is not a trace of doubt in this firm exposition. It is the Truth.
Whoever has steadfastly listened to and understood this
Even once will become Brahman.

~ Ribhu Gita (Ch.10, v.34)

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Mooji

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Ripeness is an idea. If you cling to it as an idea it will choke you. It will keep you seeking for more ripeness. You are beyond ripe and beyond ready. What I am really pointing to is what you already are, not what you should become.

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Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev

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Sadhguru on Patanjali Yoga Sutras "...............and now, Yoga."

Patanjali starts the Yoga Sutras in a very strange way. The first sutra is “…and now, yoga.” That half a sentence is one chapter. It is a very strange way to start a book of that dimension. Intellectually, it does not make any sense, but experientially what it is saying is: “If you still believe that building a new house, or finding a new wife, or getting your daughter married will settle your life, it is not yet time for yoga.

But, if you have seen power, wealth and pleasure, if you have tasted everything in your life and realised that nothing is going to work in the real sense and fulfil you ultimately, then it is time for yoga.”

All the nonsense that the whole world is involved in, Patanjali just brushes it aside with half a sentence. This is why the first sutra is “…and now, yoga.” That means, you know nothing works and you do not have a clue about what the hell this is. The pain of ignorance is tearing you apart. Now, yoga. Now there is a way to know.

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Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi

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SELF-INQUIRY OR BHAKTI-MARGA

Bhagavan: There are only two ways to conquer destiny or to be independent of it. One is to inquire whose this destiny is and discover that only the ego is bound by it and not the Self and that the ego is non-existent. The other way is to kill the ego by completely surrendering to the Lord, realizing one’s helplessness and saying all the time: “Not I, but Thou, oh Lord,” giving up all sense of “I” and “mine” and leaving it to the Lord to do what He likes with you. Surrender can never be regarded as complete so long as the devotee wants this or that from the Lord. True surrender is the love of God for the sake of love and nothing else, not even for the sake of salvation. In other words, complete effacement of the ego is necessary to conquer destiny, whether you achieve this effacement through Self-inquiry or through bhakti-marga.

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14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (1935- )

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The enemy is the necessary condition for practicing patience.

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Paramahansa Nithyananda

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Why Meditation? – From the Book “Living Enlightenment”



There are three states that we constantly experience in our lives – the waking state, dream state and deep sleep state.



In the waking state, you have the ‘I’ consciousness as well as thoughts. In the dream state, you have thoughts but you don’t have ‘I’ consciousness. Only because you don’t have ‘I’ consciousness, you are unable to control your dreams.



In the deep sleep state, you have neither ‘I’ consciousness nor thoughts.



You alternate between these three states in your normal day-to-day life. When you wish to be in deep sleep, you find yourself slipping into a disturbed dream state. When you wish to be awake, you find yourself falling asleep! These three states become more or less of a struggle in your life.



But there is a fourth state that we have not experienced. It is called turiya. In this state the ‘I’ consciousness exists but without thoughts. That is, you are aware, but you have no thoughts. This state is called thoughtless awareness. Very few people experience this in their lives. Some people experience this for a few seconds and then go back to their regular waking state.



If you get a sudden shock or if you are sitting with Nature in a completely relaxed state, in deep silence, it is possible that for a few moments you experience this thoughtless awareness. The identity is alive, the ‘I’ consciousness is alive, but there are no thoughts. This is the fourth state of turiya.



All our physical and mental illnesses take root in the dream state. The dream state starts penetrating and overlapping the deep sleep and waking states. If our waking state is penetrated by the dream state, it is called daydreaming where we fantasize or imagine endless things that we wish to do. If our deep sleep is penetrated by dreaming, it is called disturbed sleep.



Continuously during the day or night, our dream state disturbs us. When our deep sleep state is disturbed by dreams, it results in problems like chronic fatigue and insomnia. When our waking state is disturbed by dreams, we are daydreaming with less awareness of the world around us.



The more the dream state penetrates the waking state, the more the frequency of our consciousness decreases. We may be living in the human body, but we will not be living a truly human life. When the frequency of consciousness comes down, we will not be fully aware about the decisions we make. We will not be aware of the kind of words we are thinking or using. We

will not be aware of what is going on inside of us. It will be as if we are living in a house, but we do not know everything that is happening inside that house.



You may ask, ‘Why should I meditate?’ Meditation is needed to infuse deep awareness into both your waking state and the deep sleep state. Instead of the dream state penetrating the waking and deep sleep states, with meditation the turiya or blissful state will start penetrating the waking and deep sleep states!



The purpose of meditation is to experience this fourth state at least once. Once we experience this fourth state, we can bring the influence of it more and more into our waking and deep sleep states. If our waking and deep sleep states are completely influenced by the fourth state, turiya, that is what we call jeevan mukti or ‘living enlightenment’.

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Wisdom of East

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Tao is everywhere.
It cannot be kept from the sincere.

Deng Ming-Dao

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Mooji

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Actually, being what you are is the simplest. What is difficult is to stop being what you are not. Because we wish to keep hold of our attachments. Freedom is to be free of attachments and the main attachment is to the `I’-self.

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Robert Adams

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Everything that you can ever imagine,
that you want to be,
you already are.

You are the Imperishable Self
that has always been,
that you will always be.
Beyond birth, beyond death, beyond experiences,
beyond doubt, beyond opinions.
Beyond whatever it is your body is going through,
whatever thoughts your mind thinks.

You are beyond that.
You are the Silence.
The Silence of the Heart.

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Robert Adams

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Whenever some conditions arises, catch yourself, by asking yourself,
"To whom does it come?"
Even if you have to do this a thousand times a day.

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The Upanishads

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As rivers, flowing down, become indistinguishable on reaching the sea by giving up their names and forms, so also the illumined soul, having become freed from name and form, reaches the self-effulgent Supreme Self.

MUNDAKOPANISHAD

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Avadhuta Gita of Dattatreya

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When my mind began to meditate on Thee, it lost all interest in objects. When my tongue began to praise Thee it lost the power of praising others.

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Wisdom of East

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Contemplate on God as your creator, protector and the final abode to where you will return. Try to feel God with your heart; try to feel God’s presence, grace, compassion and love. Open your heart and pray, ‘O Lord, my creator, protector, and final resting place, guide me to Your light and love. Fill my heart with Your presence.

MATA AMRITANANDAMAYI

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Sri Ramakrishna

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Do you know what the marks of God’s vision are? One acquires the nature of a child. Why does one acquire a child’s nature? Because the Lord Himself has the nature of a child. So he who has God’s vision acquires a child’s nature.

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