Wisdom of East     131 posts


Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
One must be patient like the earth. What iniquities are being perpetuated on her! Yet she quietly endures them all.~ Sri Sarada Devi

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
“Compassion is not a relationship
between the healer and the
wounded. It's a relationship
between equals. Only when we
know our own darkness well can
we be present with the darkness
of others. Compassion becomes
real when we recognize our
shared humanity.”

~ Pema Chödrön ~

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
Beyond the beliefs of anyone religion,
there is the truth of the human spirit.
Beyond the power of nations,
there is the power of the human heart.

Tarthung Tulku Rinpoche

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
As long as there are conflicts in your mind, it means that you have not resolved certain things. Such conflict creates misery and then you experience the misery. You can resolve your conflicts yourself. No one else is going to resolve them for you.

~ Swami Rama

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
The paths of the Yogi



There are various yogas or paths through

which god can be realized. Like mountain

streams rushing down after heavy rains,

ultimately merge in the ocean, these paths

all lead to the same goal, God realization. The

seeker chooses the path best suited to him.

4. JAPA YOGA



Kabir the mystic poet-saint extols the power of chanting the name by saying that no drug is equal to the name and even a small quantity of it entering the body turns it into pure gold. The name, says Kabir, installed in the heart destroys all sins like a spark of fire dropped on parched gross burns it up in no time.



Indeed the name of God is more powerful than God himself. To illustrate this seemingly audacious statement our rishis relate the story of Sathyabhama’s sacrifice. Sathyabhama the favorable consort of Lord Krishna performed a religious sacrifice with the great saga Narada as the officiating priest. She promised Narada that as consideration for his services she would give him her consort Sree Krishna’s weight in gold jewels and other precious gems failing which she agreed that Narada could take Sree Krishna himself as payment for his services. The ceremony was finalized in all grandeur and Narada demanded his payment. A huge balance was secured and Lord Krishna was persuaded to sit in one pan and all the treasures of Dwaraka were heaped in the other. The coffers of the empire of Sree Krishna, the Lord of the Universe became empty as the heap in the pan grew in size but Krishna continued to be heavier than all these. Sathyabhama in her despair realized the futility of weighing the Lord against material rubbish, precious as it may seem to the world. Inspired by divine intuition, she then took a single Tulasi leaf, and wrote the two syllabled name “HARI” on it, and cleaning the pan of its load of Gems, placed this leaf therein. Immediately, to her ecstasy, the pan bearing Sree Krishna flew up, weighed down by the single Tulasi leaf on which was inscribed his name. Narada then Prostrated before the Lord and carried away the invaluable Tulasi leaf, which was more powerful than the wealth of all the worlds, and even Lord Krishna himself.



The story of Ajamila from the sacred “Bhagavatham” also testifies the glory of the Lord’s name. At the moment of death. When the terrified Ajamila shouted the name of his youngest son Narayana, (with no intention of referring to the Lord one of whose countless million names is also Narayana) the messengers of Lord Vishnu appeared and snatched away his subtle body from the emissaries of the Lord of death, Yama himself, Lord Yama then admits that even if one chants the name of the Lord by mistake in his last moments, he is beyond the clutches of death.



It is said that event he dvas pray to be born as mortals during Kaliyuga: since Kaliyuga is superior to other yugas in as much as what is achieved through meditation, performance of sacrifices and ritualistic worship of Lord Vishnu during the Satya, Treta and Dwapara yugas, can be attained through mere chanting of the divine name during the Kaliyuga.



The word Manthra comes from the root “Man” which means to think. The word “Tra” is derived from “Trai” which means to protect or to bestow freedom. It is said: ‘Mananat trayate iti Mantrah’ which means, by constantly thinking and recollection of which one is protected and released from the ceaseless round of births and deaths, is a Manthra.



A mind covered by layers of dirt of lust anger greed hatred and desire is most easily cleaned by the spiritual vibration of Mantra. Just as a mirror covered by layers of dust and dirt regains its power of reflection by the mere touch of a clean wet cloth, and is able to reflect reality once again, the mind is cleaned by the touch of the Manthra and finds itself able to reflect the higher glory of God.


---Govindh K.Bharathan

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
The paths of the Yogi



There are various yogas or paths through

which god can be realized. Like mountain

streams rushing down after heavy rains,

ultimately merge in the ocean, these paths

all lead to the same goal, God realization. The

seeker chooses the path best suited to him.


3. KARMA YOGA



The root of the word “Karma” is Kri’ which means to do. The word Karma in Vedantic language has several connotations. However in the context of Karma Yoga it symbolizes the concept of work or action. All mankind is constantly involved in Karma. Anything done at the physical or mental plane is Karma and Karma leaves its indelible mark on man. It is the eternal law of Karma that all earning is the result of work. Our existence today, all we are now is a result of our past Karma, such Karma not being restricted to this life alone but stretching backwards to countless previous lives. What we will be in future is also consequently a result of our present actions. The direct result between action and its fruit thus causes all action to be result-oriented. Men work for fame, for money, and for a variety of material ends. Result – oriented work binds man in the web of Karma.



To understand the basic principles of the Yoga of Karma it is necessary to go into the basic principles of action and result. By his very nature, and the nature of the universe, man is bound down to incessant work. Any type of work is composed of both good and evil and the result will also consequently be a mixture of good and evil. Even action motivated by the noblest of ideals will result in some harm to someone, however small it may be and similarly action instigated by evil intentions will result in some good to someone however slight or in consequential. Thus the concrete result of any type of action performed by man will be a mixture of good and evil. Both these actions result in bondage of the soul. Good actions bind man equally as bad action. A chain of gold binds just as strongly and efficiently as an iron chain.



What than is the golden means to rid ourselves of the bondage of Karma ? We see that in Karma Yoga, actions done must necessarily yield fruit, and no amount of effort can stop this action from yielding fruit. The sages and saints of India have come up with golden path which will grant this final freedom from the bondage created by actions, both good and evil. The solution to this is total and final eradication of the ego of the worker, an entire self abnegation of the “I” and attributing everything to “Tho”. To a man who does this all actions performed by him become acts of worship to the supreme Absolute reality. He understands that his little self which is apparently performing these actions is nothing but an instrument in the hands of a higher force. Such a man performs all Karma as an agent of the Divine. He is ‘unattached’ to both the action and the fruit of the action. His self abnegation is such that he takes no credit for doing good, treating such actions only as having been performed by him on the dictates of higher all knowing power. Unselfishness is the hallmark of the actions. he who by eradicating the small self and treating all action as having been pre-ordained by the larger all powerful self, and such actions to have been woven into the warp and woof of his work-oriented life, by this Higher Power, is said to be a Karma Yogi.



In the Bhagavad –Geetha, Lord Krishna tells Arjuna that “non attachment” to work will redeem the soul from the bondage of Karma. The answer is to work through love. Love motivated action brings only happiness to all. When love motivates an action, no return or result is demanded, for love is its own reward. Action untainted by desire for the fruit of action cannot bind the soul. Action thus without desire for the fruit, unattached to action. Without feeling of doer ship is the sum and essence of Karma Yogi.



Bhagawan Sri. Sathya Sai Baba has described the symbolism of the Holy Cross in these immortal words.



“Cut the feeling of I clean across

and let your ego die on the cross

to endow on you Eternity”.



It is only when the “I” in all our actions is cut clean across that we are freed from the bondage of action. This again is the sum and the essence of Karma Yogi.



It is at this point of total self-abnegation that the three important systems of philosophy, ie., Jnana Yoga, Karma Yoga and Bhakti Yoga meet. The Karma Yogi says “I am nothing; You are everything: I do not act; only you do: and hence all my actions are Yours”.

Govindh K.Bharathan

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
The paths of the Yogi



There are various yogas or paths through

which god can be realized. Like mountain

streams rushing down after heavy rains,

ultimately merge in the ocean, these paths

all lead to the same goal, God realization. The

seeker chooses the path best suited to him.

2. BHAKTI YOGA



Seemingly opposite appears to be the path of Bhakthi Yoga. The Bhakta chooses the path of love with its nectarine sweetness. The intensity of his love for God expresses itself in the realization that the entire world of name and form is nothing but a manifestation of his loved one the Supreme Reality – God. He sees his beloved present everywhere . Anything perceived felt or transmitted by his senses is recognized by him as a manifestation of the lover one.



The path of Bhakti has one unique feature. It is not only the path to God, it is in itself the end of realization – of as Swami Vivekananda puts it, Bhakti becomes the instrument and the thing to be attained.



The Bhakta shuns the pit-falls of reason on the to realization. His aim is perception, not pedantry. He is not interested in learned a arguments or intricate mental gymnastics. He feels more than he thinks. To him, the whole world is his beloved. Chaitanya Mahaprabhy used to look at the blue sky and go into a trance as it reminded him of the hue of the divine cowherd of Brindavan. Every cell of his body is permeated with his beloved Lord’s presence. The beautiful story of the King of Bhaktas-Hanuman comes to one’s mind. After the conquest of Lanka, Janaki presented hanuman with an invaluable necklace of pearls. Hanuman, the monkey god took the necklace to pieces and bit into each pearl and appeared to be peering inside each gem for some strange reason. Sita, in utter consternation at this amazing vandalism and prodded by curiosity asked Hanuman to explain his strange behaviour Hanuman replied that he was looking for the name and form of the lotus eyed Rama inside each pearl, and since he could not find this inside any of the pearls, to him, they were only valueless baubles. The enraged Sita then asked Hanuman whether if some one opened him up, they would find Rama inside him, and if not, would his body then have to be rejected as useless? The story goes that Hanuman thereupon wordlessly tore his bare chest open with his nails and revealed the divine form of Rama inside the deepest recesses of his ravaged heart!



One of the pitfalls of Bhakti is that sometimes it degenerates into a narrow love for what one considers being the only aspect of the divine, with total rejection and hatred towards anyone else’s ideal of divinity. Fanatics of all creeds are votaries of this form of misguided love, and the damage which can be wrecked by such fanaticism has left its permanent scars on history. Some of the foulest crimes on humanity have been perpetuated by such degenerates. True Bhakti is of a different mould. It is so soaked in the bliss of divine love, that hatred is as alien to the Bhakta as light is to darkness.



Every living being knows love – in some form or the other. The mother knows without being instructed, how to love her child; the lover needs no directions on how to yearn for his beloved, nor does he need any manthra to keep his loved one’s form always in him mind. Bhakti Yoga is the means to divert this natural inclination to love, inbuilt in each human heart, towards the highest, the Supreme – to make it an instrument in its search for its own source, for God is indeed Love –just as Love is God.



Once Bhakti flows into the heart, all other attachments are washed away. The Bhakta sees his beloved behind each form and hears his loved one’s sound in each and every name. All religious stands revealed to him as glorious paths traced by enlightened seers to guide the faithful towards his beloved. The colour of the sun set reflects the blush on the cheek of his loved one and the coolness of the breeze is the breath of his Divine Master. This is where the path or Bhakti mingles and merges with that of Jnan. Hanuman said to Rama.



“Considered as the body I am your servant;

Conceived as the Jiva I am part of you,

Cognized as the Atma I am nothing but you.



The Bhakta says; “Who am I, but You? You are all; without you I am nothing. With you, I also am all”

--- Govindh K.Bharathan

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
The paths of the Yogi



There are various yogas or paths through

which god can be realized. Like mountain

streams rushing down after heavy rains,

ultimately merge in the ocean, these paths

all lead to the same goal, God realization. The

seeker chooses the path best suited to him.



1. JNANA YOGA



Those blessed with intellectual and mental equipment capable of grasping the ultimate truth, that the Atman is the substratum of everything manifest in the universe, that Atma or Brahman pervades all, unsupported by anything but itself, resides in all forms without being those forms, exists in everything as the indweller but does not suffer change relating to those things, and that this is the entity which in human beings dwells within the body mind and intellect as the Jivatma, the principle of life in all beings, immutable unchangeable, beyond understanding through the senses, follow the path of Janan. Those who realize this supreme truth, merge in the truth. Their finite identities melt into the infinite, and like a drop of water falling into the ocean becomes the ocean, they merge into the ultimate, lasting and eternal truth. This is the path of Janan-Yoga. The Jivatma transcending the body mind and intellect realizes its oneness with the Paramatma.



The Jnani considers reality as the Universal, the infinite and does not limit it to his separate identity-his individuality. He realizes that infinity is his true nature and all limitations are unreal.



Just as bubbles in the water are nothing but the water, this multifaceted external world with its multiplicity of name and form is nothing but Brahman. The Atma is unborn changeless and beyond death. It does not know old age nor does it suffer from decline or disease. These attributes are for our fleeting evanescent bodies which we in our delusion consider to be our real selves. This delusion is caused by the mind. The Janani conquers his mind, frees himself from its bondage and rises above attachment, hate pride, jealousy and greed.



The Jivi or the individual, labours under the delusion that he is a limited conditioned entity consisting of the body-mind-intellect apparatus. This delusion that hides the true nature of the Jivi is called Maya. The concept of Maya is peculiar to Hindu philosophy. Briefly it can be described as the power of super-imposition of the limited over the infinite. The Jnani is one who rips open the veil of Maya and realizes the unity of the Jiva with the Paramatma or the Brahman.



Ramana Maharishi, the Sage of Arnachala used to confront all persons who came to him with their limited individual worldly problems with the question “who am I? Are you the body which is a temporary passing entity subject to the vagaries of change? If you are what happens when the body dies and is cast on the funeral pyre. It did not exist before you were born- It will cease to exist after you die, But the indweller, the imperishable Jiva remains unchanged by this process of birth, change and death of the body. In the Bhagavad-Geeta,Lord Krishna tells Arjuna:



“As a man discarding worn-out clothes takes other new ones, likewise the embodied soul, casting off worn-out bodies enters into others which are new”.



(B.G.Chapter II Stanza 22)



By its very nature the mind creates the bondage of craving for objects. The Jnani withdraws his mind from attachments and becomes free of the bondage of the world of objects.



The Jnani is above hatred. He is all love since he sees no distinction between “Mine” and “Thine”. He is above joy and sorrow, pleasure and pain, unmoved by praise or condemnation. Having realized his true identity, untrammeled by the bondage of the mind and the limitations of the body, the Jnani says “I am you, you are all; hence I am all”


--- Govindh K.Bharathan

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
it is impossible to build one's own happiness on the unhappiness of others. This perspective is at the heart of Buddhist teachings.”

~ Daisaku Ikeda ~

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
Those who are skilled in combat do not become angered,
those who are skilled at winning do not become afraid.
Thus the wise win before the fight, while the ignorant fight to win.

Morihei Ueshiba

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
What we call "I" is just a swinging door which moves when we inhale and when we exhale.”

~ Shunryu Suzuki

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
Even if the sky falls on your head, or even if a sword is firmly driven through your chest , do not slip from your true state.

Desur Mastan Swamigal - verse 5

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
When my Beloved appears,
With what eye do I see Him?
With His eye, not with mine,
For none sees Him except Himself....

~ Ibn Arabi~

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
You ask why I make my home
in the mountain forest,
and I smile, and am silent,
and even my soul remains quiet:
it lives in the other world
which no one owns.
The peach trees blossom,
The water flows.

~ Li Po

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
Life is a mystery. You cannot understand it unless you surrender, for your intellect cannot grasp its expansive and infinite nature, its real meaning and fullness. Bow down low and be humble; then you will know life's meaning.

~ Amma

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
I, Lalla, willingly entered through the garden-gate,
There, O Joy! I found Shiva united with Shakti;
There and then I got absorbed drinking at the Lake of Nectar.
Immune to harm am I, dead as I am to the world, though still alive.

- 14th century Kashmiri Poet-Seer Lalla

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
Amritanubhava

I offer homage to the god and the goddess
The infinite parents of the world
The Lover out of boundless love Has become the Beloved
Both are made of the same silks and share the same food
Out of love for each other they merge and part for the joy of being two
They sit together on the same ground in the same garment of light
From endless time they have lived this way in union and in bliss
Without the goddess he is not and because of him she exists
It is God alone in every form the male and the female Shiva and Shakti
From the union of these two the universe has come to be
Two lutes, one note
Two lamps, one light
Two eyes, one sight
Two lips, one word
Two hearts, one love
In this way these two create one universe
The lover out of boundless love has become the beloved
Embarrassed by his formlessness and her own graceful form
She adorned him with a universe of myriad names and forms
In unity there is little to behold
But the playful Shakti has presented all the riches of the world
While Shiva sleeps she is giving birth to all things
Living and non-living
And when she rests her husband disappears
When he hides himself he can't be found without her grace
They are mirrors to each other
When he embraces her it is own bliss that he enjoys
Shiva the enjoyer of all, can find no joy without her
She is his form and her beauty comes from her lover
And in their merging they enjoy this feast feast together
Shiva and Shakti are the same
Like musk and its fragrance
Or gold and its luster
Embracing each other they merge into one
As darkness and light at the breaking of the dawn
The lover out of boundless love has become the beloved
And when the time of dissolution comes
The ocean and the river merge into the primal water
And the air and its motion merge in the universal air
And the sun and its brilliance merge in the elemental fire
And while trying to see Shiva and Shakti
Both I and my vision disappeared
Like the wood that gives itself onto the fire
And the river that gives itself onto the sea
When my ego is out I become Shiva and Shakti

- 11th century Indian mystic Jnaneshwar

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
"The gate of heaven is wide open,
without a single obstruction before it.
I sometimes wonder when I will wake up?
Wake up to see that there is truly nothing to fear.
What can I say that hasn't already been said?
What can I do that hasn't already been done?
The joy is simply in the Being.
Not being this or that.
I like watching the sun in the morning.
And the moon watches over me at night."

~ Chinese Hermit

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
“There is a famous saying: "If the mind is not contrived, it is spontaneously blissful, just as water, when not agitated, is by nature transparent and clear".”

~ Sogyal Rinpoche

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
DHARMA TALK ON ONE MIND

by Bassui Tokusho Zenji

If you would free yourself of the sufferings of the Six Realms, you must learn the direct way to become a Buddha. This way is no other than the realization of your own Mind. Now what is this Mind? It is the true nature of all sentient beings, that which existed before our parents were born and hence before our own birth, and which presently exists, unchangeable and eternal. So it is called one's Face before one's parents were born. This Mind is intrinsically pure. When we are born it is not newly created, and when we die it does not perish. It has no distinction of male or female, not has it any coloration of good or bad. It cannot be compared with anything, so it is called Buddha-nature. Yet countless thoughts issue from this Self-nature as waves arise in the ocean or as images are reflected in a mirror.

If you want to realize your own Mind, you must first of all look into the source from which thoughts flow. Sleeping and working, standing and sitting, profoundly ask yourself, "What is my own Mind?" with an intense yearning to resolve this question. This is called "training" or "practice" or "desire for truth" or "thirst for realization." What is termed Zazen is no more than looking into one's own mind. It is better to search your own mind devotedly than to read and recite innumerable sutras and dharani every day for countless years. Such endeavors, which are but formalities, produce some merit, but this merit expires and again you must experience the suffering of the Three Evil Paths. Because searching one's own mind leads ultimately to enlightenment, this practice is a prerequisite to becoming a Buddha. No matter whether you have committed either the ten evil deeds or the five deadly sins, still if you turn back your mind and enlighten yourself, you are a Buddha instantly. But do not commit sins and expect to be saved by enlightenment [from the effects of your own actions. Neither enlightenment] nor a Buddha nor a Patriarch can save a person who, deluding himself, goes down evil ways.

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
Zen-Master Bassui Tokusho
(1327 – 1387)

In the year 1327, toward the close of the Kaniakura era - that strife torn, anxiety-ridden period of Japanese history which produced so many notable religious figures - the Rinzai Zen master Bassui Tokusho was born. Having had a vision that the child she was carrying would one day become a fiend who would slay both his parents, his mother abandoned him in a field at birth, where a family servant secretly rescued and reared him.
At seven Bassui's sensitive religious mind began to evince itself. At a memorial service for his late father he suddenly asked die officiating priest: "For whom are those offerings of rice and cakes and fruit?*' "For your father, of course," replied the priest, *'But Father has no shape or body now,1 so how can he eat them?" To this the priest answered; "Though he has no visible body, his soul will receive these offerings." "If there is such a thing as a soul," the child pressed on, "I must have one in my body. What is it like?"
To be sure, these are not unusual questions from a thoughtful, sensitive child of seven. For Bassui, however, they were only the beginning of an intense, unremitting self-inquiry which was to continue well into manhood - until, in fact, he had achieved full enlightenment. Even during his play with other children he was never free of these uncertainties as to the existence of a soul, His preoccupation with a soul naturally led him to think about hell. In an agony of fear he would exclaim; "How awful to be consumed by the flames of hell!" and tears would well up. When he was ten, he relates, he was often awakened by brilliant flashes of light which filled his room, followed by an all-enveloping darkness. Anxiously he sought for some explanation of these weird occurrences, but the replies that were forthcoming scarcely allayed his fears.
Again and again he questioned himself: "If after death the soul suffers the agonies of hell or enjoys the delights of paradise, what is the nature of this soul? But if there is no soul, what is it within me which thisvery moment is seeing and hearing?" His biographer1 relates that Bassui would often sit for hours" stewmg " over this question in a state of such utter sclf-forgetfulncss that he no longer knew he had a body or a mind. On one such occasion-at what age we are not told-Bassui suddenly directly realized that the substratum of all things is a viable Emptitieis, and that there is in essence tiothmg which cm be called a soul, a body, or a mind. This realization caused him to break into deep laughter, and he no longer felt himself oppressed by his body and mind.
In an effort to learn whether this constituted true satori, Bassui questioned a number of well-known monks, but none could give him a satisfying answer. "At any rate," he told himself, "T no longer have doubts about the truth of the Dharma*" But his basic perplexity as to the one who sees and hears had not been dispelled, and when he saw in a popular book one day "Mind is host and body guest." every one of his quiescent doubts was suddenly resurrected. "T have seen that the foundation of the universe is Voidness; still what is this something within me which can see and hear?" he desperately asked himself anew. In spite of every effort, he could not rid himself of this doubt.
Nominally Bassui was a samurai, having been bom into a samurai family. Whether he actually pursued the duties of a samurai his biographer does not reveal, but it seems safe to conclude that Bassui' s continuous search for Zen masters would have given him little opportunity, and presumably as little taste, for the life of a samurai. At all events, we do know that Bassui had his head shaved at twenty-nine, symbolizing his initiation into the Buddhist monkhood. For the ceremonial rites of a monk or priest, however, he had little use, believing a monk should live a simple life dedicated to attaining the highest truth so as to lead others to liberation, and not engage in ceremony and luxurious living, not to mention political intrigue, to which the priesthood of his day was only too prone.
On his numerous pilgrimages he stubbornly refused to remain even overnight in a temple, but insisted on staying in some isolated hut high up on a hill or mountain, where he would sit hour after hour doing zazen away from the distractions of the temple. To stay awake he would often climb a tree, perch among the branches, and deeply ponder his natural koan, "Who is the master?" far into the night, oblivious to wind and rain. In the morning, with virtually no sleep or food, he would go to the temple or monastery for an interview with the master. So strong was Bassui?s distaste for the ceremonialism of the temple that many years later, after he had become master of Kogaku-ji, he always insisted on calling it Kogaku-an instead, the suffix -an meaning "hermitage" as opposed to the more grandiose -ji meaning "temple" or "monastery.".
In the course of his spiritual journeys Bassui eventually met the Zen master through whom his Mind`s Eye was to be completely opened - Koho-zenji, a great roshi of his day. The lesser masters from whom Bassui had sought guidance had all sanctioned his enlightenment, but Koho, sensing Bassui`s keen, sensitive mind and the strength and purity of his yearning for truth, did not give him his stamp of approval but merely invited him to remain. On his part, Bassui recognized in Koho a great roshi but declined to stay in his temple, taking a solitary hut in the nearby hills and for the next month coming daily to see Koho.
One day Koho, sensing the ripeness of Bassui`s mind, asked him: "Tell me, what is Joshu`s Mu?" Bassui replied with a verse:

Mountains and rivers
Grass and trees
Equally manifest Mu.

Koho retorted: "Your reply has traces of self-consciousness!" All at once, his biographer relates, Bassui felt as though he had "lost his life root, like a barrel whose bottom had been smashed open." Sweat began to stream from every pore of his body, and when be left Koho's room he was in such a daze that he bumped his head several times along the walls trying to find the outer gate of the temple. Upon reaching his hut he wept for hours from his very depths. The tears overflowed, "pouring down his face like rain." In the intense combustion of this overwhelming experience Bassui's previously-held conceptions and beliefs, we are told, were utterly destroyed.
The following evening Bassui came to tell Koho what had happened. Hardly had he opened his mouth when Koho, who had despaired of ever finding a true successor among his monks, declared, as though addressing ail his followers; "My Dharma will not vanish, All may now be happy. My Dharma will not disappear." Koho formally conferred inka on his disciple and gave him the Zen name "Bassui" - "high above average." Bassui remained for two months near Koho, receiving his instructions and guidance, But Bassui, who had a strong and independent mind, wished to mature his profound experience through "Dharma combat" with accomplished masters so as to integrate his experience thoroughly into his conscious mind and into his every act, and to develop his capacity to teach others. So he left Koho and continued to live an isolated life in forests, hills, and mountains not far from the temples of famous masters. When not engaging them in "Dharma combat" he would carry on his zazen for hours at a time.
Wherever he stayed zealous aspirants quickly discovered his where-abouts and sought his guidance but feeling himself still deficient in the spiritual strength necessary to lead others to liberation, he resisted their efforts to make him their teacher. When their entreaties became importunate he would pick up his meager belongings and vanish in the night. Apart from the entreaties of would-be disciples, however, he deliberately curtailed his stay in any one place so as not to become attached to it. At length - now fifty - Bassui built himself a hut deep in a mountain near the town of Enzan in Yamanashi Prefecture. As had happened in the past, word spread through the nearby village of the presence in the mountain of a Bodhisattva, and seekers again began literally to beat a path to his hut. Now, his enlightenment having ripened and feeling himself capable of leading others to emancipation, he no longer turned away from these seekers but willingly accepted all who came. Soon they became a sizable flock, and when the governor of the province offered to donate land for a monastery and his followers offered to build it, Bassui agreed to become its roshi.
Although Bassui disliked the designation "temple" or "monastery," Kogaku-ji at its apogee, with more than a thousand monks and lay devotees, could hardly be described as a hermitage. Bassui was a rigid disciplinarian, and of the thirty-three rules which he promulgated for the behavior of his disciples, interestingly enough, the first prohibited the imbibing of alcohol in any form. Just before he passed away, at the age of sixty, Bassui sat up in the lotus posture and, to those gathered around him. said: ''Don't be misled! Look directly! What is this?" He repeated this loudly and then calmly died.
Taken from the book: "The three Pillars of Zen", by Roshi Philip Kapleau

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
Tao is everywhere.
It cannot be kept from the sincere.

Deng Ming-Dao

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
Contemplate on God as your creator, protector and the final abode to where you will return. Try to feel God with your heart; try to feel God’s presence, grace, compassion and love. Open your heart and pray, ‘O Lord, my creator, protector, and final resting place, guide me to Your light and love. Fill my heart with Your presence.

MATA AMRITANANDAMAYI

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
"When you meditate, it is essential to create the right inner environment of the mind. All effort and struggle come from not being spacious, and so creating that right environment is vital for your meditation truly to happen. When humor and spaciousness are present, meditation arises effortlessly."

~ Sogyal Rinpoche

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
As long as you seek for something, you will get the shadow of reality and not reality itself.

~ Shunryu Suzuki

Andriy shared a Wisdom of East quote         SHARE URL

Wisdom of East

See More
Wake up my mind, wake up from the
oblivion of sleep
The body that came with you will soon
bid you goodbye . . .
Says Nanak, sing the praise of the
Ultimate One
For all else is an ephemeral dream . . .

~ Guru Granth Sahib

Contribute to the project

Support and Contribute to This Project of Sharing and Spreading Timeless Wisdom.

Thank you!

· · ·   View More Channels   · · · Random Being
Our Friends:
Buddha at the Gas Pump Big library of interviews with awakened and inspiring beings of our time. Swami Vivekananda Quotes Beautiful library of Swami Vivekananda Inspirational works.