Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One     48 posts



Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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ON CHANGE

"What then of this fathom-long body ? Is there anything here of which it may rightly be said , "i" or "mine" or "am"? Nay verily nothing whatsoever.


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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Accept my words only
when you have examined
them for yourselves; do not
accept them simply because
of the reverence you have
for me. Those who only
have faith in me and
affection for me will not
find the final freedom. But
those who have faith in the
truth and are determined on
the path, they will find
awakening.

[Majjhima Nikaya]


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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"Develop the quiet even state of mind, when praised by some, condemned by others, free the mind from hate and pride and gently go your way in peace...
Learn this from the waters: in mountain clefts and chasms, loud gush the streamlets, but great rivers flow silently."

(SN: Nalaka sutta)


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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The rain could turn to gold And still your thirst would not be slaked.
Desire is unquenchable Or it ends in tears, even in heaven.


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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The mind is luminous, but it is stained by defilements that come from without. Ordinary folk do not realize this, so they do not cultivate the mind. The mind is luminous, but it can be cleansed of defilements that come from without. This the noble disciples understand, so they do cultivate the mind.

(Anguttara Nikaya I.10)


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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Love yourself and be awake - today, tomorrow, always.
First establish yourself in the way, then teach others, and so defeat sorrow.
To straighten the crooked you must first do a harder thing -straighten yourself.
You are the only master. Who else? Subdue yourself,
and discover you are the master.


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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As I am, so are others....
As others are, so am I...
Having thus identified self and others,
Never harm anyone, nor have any abused.


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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Whoever gives wins merit. Whoever is self-controlled, without anger, pure in virtue, & who all evil shuns, will by the rooting out of all lust, hate and confusion, arrive at pure peace. Digha Nikaya 2.197


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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"Sutra on the Middle Way" (Samyukta Agama 301)

Walking the Middle Way

“I heard these words of the Buddha one time when the Lord was staying at the guesthouse in a forest of the district of Nala. At that time, the Venerable Kaccayanna came to visit him and asked, "The Tathagata has spoken of Right View. How would the Tathagata describe Right View?"

The Buddha told the venerable monk, "People in the world tend to believe in one of two views: the view of being or the view of nonbeing. That is because they are bound to wrong perception. It is wrong perception that leads to the concepts of being and non-being. Kaccayana, most people are bound to internal formations of discrimination and preference, grasping and attachment. Those who are not bound to the internal knots of grasping and attachment no longer imagine and cling to the idea of a self. They understand, for example, that suffering comes to be when conditions are favorable, and that it fades away when conditions are no longer favorable. They no longer have any doubts. Their understanding has not come to them through others; it is their own insight. This insight is called Right View, and this is the way the Tathagata would describe Right View.

"How is this so? When a person who has correct insight observes the coming to be of the world, the idea of nonbeing does not arise in her, and when she observes the fading away of the world, the idea being does not arise in her mind. Kaccayana, view the world as being is an extreme; viewing the world as nonbeing is another extreme. The Tathagata avoids these two extremes and teaches the Dharma of walking the Middle Way.

The Middle Way says that this is, because that is; This is not, because that is not. Because there is ignorance, there are impulses; because there are impulses, there is consciousness; because there is consciousness, there is the psche-soma; because there is psyche-soma, there are six senses; because there is the six senses there is contact; because there is contact, there is feeling; because there is feeling, there is craving; because there is craving there is grasping; because there is grasping there is becoming; because there is becoming there is birth; because there is birth, there are old age, death, grief and sorrow. That is how this entire mass of suffering arises. But with the fading away of ignorance, impulses cease; with the fading away of impulses, consciousness ceases...and finally old age, death, grief and sorrow will fade away. That is how the entire mass of suffering ceases."

After listening to the Buddha, the Venerable Kaccayana was enlightened and liberated from sorrow. He was able to untie all of his internal knots and attain arhatship.”


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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Do not resent the heavens for one's fate. Do not blame our problems on others . Realize the negative cause lies within us, was created by us... And can only be changed by us, resolved by us with understanding, diligence and love.


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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There are five things which no one is able to accomplish in this world: first, to cease growing old when he is growing old; second, to cease being sick; third, to cease dying; fourth, to deny dissolution when there is dissolution; fifth, to deny non-being.


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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If we associate and learn from virtuous and wise people, we will benefit greatly. Day by day our own virtues and wisdom will grow and our faults will lessen.


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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Before we can help, we need to understand.
Before we can understand, we need to listen.
Before we can listen, we need to be quiet.


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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"As solid rock remains unmoved by the wind, so the wise remain unmoved by blame and praise."


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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The mind is unstable and flighty.
It wanders wherever it desires.
Therefore it is good to control the mind.
A disciplined mind brings happiness


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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There is no fire like passion
No crime like hatred,
No sorrow like separation,
No sickness like hunger,
And no joy like the joy of freedom.


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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Buddha said:



• I consider the positions of kings and rulers as that of dust motes.



• I observe treasures of gold and gems as so many bricks and pebbles.



• I look upon the finest silken robes as tattered rags.



• I see myriad worlds of the universe as small seeds of fruit, and the greatest lake in India as a drop of oil upon my foot.



• I perceive the teachings of the world as the illusions of magicians.



• I discern the highest conception of emancipation as a golden brocade in a dream, and view the holy path of the illuminated ones as flowers appearing in one's eyes.



• I see meditation as a pillar of a mountain, nirvana as a nightmare of daytime.



• I look upon the judgments of right and wrong as the serpentine dance of a dragon, and the rise and fall of belief as traces left by the four seasons.


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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Meditation brings wisdom; lack of mediation leaves ignorance. Know well what leads you forward and what hold you back, and choose the path that leads to wisdom.


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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The Buddha pointed out that life is suffering and that suffering is caused by ignorance and desire. In order to end suffering, one has to follow the path shown by the Buddha, it is the Noble Eightfold Path. It means right understanding - understanding the law of cause and effect; right thought - pure and kind thoughts; right speech - truthful and gentle speech; right action - good and law-abiding conduct; right livelihood - proper and purposeful occupation; right effort - striving to improve and progress; right mindfulness - mindful of thought and conduct; right meditation - practicing meditation to gain wisdom. He said, "We must guard against the three fires of greed, hatred and ignorance, as they keep burning in our minds causing sufferings. To put out the fire of greed, one must avoid the extremes of sensual indulgence and self-torture. To put out the fire of hatred, one must practice compassion. To put out the fire of ignorance, one must understand the Four Noble Truths and practice the Noble Eightfold Path." He emphasized compassion in his teaching. He told us to be concerned for each other, to help each other. He emphasized the equality to all beings and stressed on self-reliance. He said that everyone has the Buddha nature and everyone can become a Buddha provided he himself practices diligently.

The Buddha said that everyone is responsible for his own actions. Virtuous action creates good karma and non-virtuous action brings bad karma. One can be reborn in any of the six realms. The six realms are the god realm, the demi-god realm, the human realm, the animal realm, the hungry ghost realm and the hell realm. The karma of one's past determines which of the six realms he will be reborn in. He showed us the Noble Eightfold Path, by practicing which we can be freed the cycle of birth and death, and attain the supreme happiness of Nirvana


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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You, monks, should not thus cultivate the notion of impermanence, suffering and non-Self, the notion of impurity and so forth, deeming them to be the true meaning of the Dharma, as those people searching in a pool for a radiant gem did, each thinking that bits of brick, stones, grass and gravel were the jewel. You should train yourselves well in efficacious means. In every situation, constantly meditate upon the idea of the Self, the idea of the Eternal, the Bliss, and the Pure ... Those who, desirous of attaining Reality, meditatatively cultivate these ideas, namely, the ideas of the Self, the Eternal, the Bliss, and the Pure, will skilfully bring forth the jewel, just like that wise person who obtained the genuine, priceless gem, rather than worthless detritus misperceived as the real thing.

- The Buddha, Chapter Three, The Mahayana Mahaparinirvana Sutra


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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The secret of happiness lies
in the mind's release from worldly ties.


Prince Siddhartha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BC) the Enlightened One

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What the great Buddha has praised as pure,
the state that is called immediate,
there exists nothing equal to that state.

-Sutta Nipata 226

Should we free our mind from attachment to all "things,"
the Path becomes clear; otherwise,
we put ourselves under restraint.

-The Sutra of Hui Neng

From pure behavior comes self-power,
which frees a man from (many) dangers;
pure conduct, like a ladder,
enables us to climb to heaven.

-Fo-Sho-Hing-Tsan-King

With a free mind,
In no debt,
Enjoy what has been given to you.

- Therigatha, translated by Susan Murcott

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